About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
MSNBC 32
MSNBCW 31
CSPAN 19
FBC 12
FOXNEWS 12
CNNW 11
CNN 9
CSPAN2 8
CNBC 6
KGO (ABC) 5
KQED (PBS) 4
WBAL (NBC) 3
WETA 3
WJLA (ABC) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 192
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 192 (some duplicates have been removed)
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> hello, everybody. i'm melisilissa rehberger. wall street will be back in business tomorrow. they will reopen wednesday after hurricane sandy shut down trading for two days. the organizers of the new york city marathon say they are going ahead with sunday's race despite the damage caused by sandy. meanwhile, ubs announced it will cut up to 10,000 jobs by 2015. they say they're tryin
that this is all bogus science? who -- are they phonies? are they quacks? >> there are different motivations. some people don't want to hear about global warming because it's bad news and there's enough bad news in the world and everybody has plenty to worry about anyway. some people don't want to hear about it because it gets in the way of their economic interests, those would be the fossil fuel companies, for instance. and some people are just generally skeptical and don't like experts, and, frankly, i don't like experts all the time myself either. but these are the facts. every academy of science of every major country in the world has said this is happening. it's happening now. it's only going to get worse until we start taking actions to stem the emissions that are causing the problem. but in the meantime, this stuff is going to be happening even if we get emissions under control for some time, for decades, so we have to learn how to adapt better, how to prepare for such a potential disaster, how to mitigate their damages. >> we don't have any high ground to go to in this where we have 6 bill
. susan mchale, director of the social science research institute and one of the corps organizers of the network is here with us today. can you please stand and be recognized? thank you. [applause] >> we also made a pledge to educate our university community about ethics. it is one thing to know the rules, regulations and policies. it is another thing to create a culture where every employee wants to do the right thing the first time everytime. through training and awareness building efforts, we are trying to help people understand the how, when, where and why of reporting. i assure you can state takes this commitment very seriously. that is not a glib promised. to prove it we have stepped up our efforts and compliance. like most universities and state has dozens of compliance professionals. they are responsible for insuring research funds are appropriately used. they monitor our ncaa compliance, financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting and administer many more regulations related to the health, welfare and safety of those on camp
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
believes in science and does not scoff at the idea of climate change and has taken concrete action to combat it, mr. bloomberg said the choice to him is clear. "one sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet. one does not. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." this endorsement criticized mitt romney's leadership on the other hand saying, "in the past mr. romney has also taken sensible positions, but he has reversed course on all of them and is even running against the health care model he signed into law in massachusetts." mike bloomberg criticizes mr. romney specifically for flip-flopping and dropping his previous positions on climate change then says, "this issue is too important. we need determined leadership at the national level." in other words, i don't think we're going to get determined leadership from mitt romney. i think he has taken occasionally attractive positions, but leadership, no. speaking to you from new york city, this storm and its aftermath, this externality to the big election i
science to get in the way of politics but the obama administration hasn't been out front on the issue either. we will talk mother nature's revenge when chris hayes joins us just ahead. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop t
the final 12 miles from the l.a. airport to the science center proved to be some of the toughest crews chopped down 400 trees to clear the path for the endeavour. in a matter of hours nasa will update us on the rover mission to mars. curiosity is almost three months into its two year mission. it has sent back images and scooped up martian sand for analysis. if everything goes as planned curiosity will make its way to mount sharp within a year to determine chemistry and whether the red planet has ever harbored life. update from fast 11:30. >>> sandy's path of misery millions without power thousands flooded out in the east. the super storm is living up to its name. live with the statest coming up. >>> we'll tell you about the search-and-rescue role as the storm surges across the east coast. ah. fire bad! just have to fire roast these tomatoes. do you churn your own butter too? what? this is going to give you a head start on your dinner. that seems easier sure does who are you? [ female announcer ] new progresso recipe starters. five delicious cooking sauces you combine with fresh ingre
screens. i was down at the tech museum of innovation today and they are having a science festival so we were doing the whole flew tog thing. that wasn't too bad. you can make your own down there and learn all about the arts and crafts down there making innovative new things. if it doesn't work, there are crashes like mine, just build it again. around the bay area today, we are looking at some sunshine and a few high clouds outside. the temperatures right now not too bad. 62 degrees in concord. 60 in livermore. 61 san francisco. and 61 degrees in san jose. as you head towards san jose, still hazy outside. it's taken a while for low clouds and fog to break up. we are still going to see clouds into the afternoon but motors of that will be high clouds. temperatures cooler at the coast with mild temperatures inland tonight low clouds and fog likely to make a return but what a weekend we have coming our way. cold front trying to move in before the ridge can build in so we are going to see a few high clouds this afternoon and that's it. then this ridge kicks into gear building this for the wee
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
in these terms and thought of economics as a moral science. and that you needed to ask always the question enough for what, what is money for? otherwise you are adrift. you just go on accumulating without end, without purpose. so he said enough for a good life. and he thought that technology was bringing that about. that it was actually producing such increases in weths th s ise would be able to have abundance with a fraction of the work. that people would then do. but that bit of it hasn't come about. >> why? >> i think a number of explanations. one is that our society's become much more unequal than it was when canes was writing. the other is i think he underestimated the force of insatiablity. the relative character -- >> you end up with new needs and new wants. if you have one car, you feel like maybe it will be even more fun to have three. in the book it seems to me -- correct me if i'm wrong -- briefly what you're saying is you need a good what we would consider good or upper middle-class in terms of material comforts, house, things like that. beyond that, the kind of constant accumulation
. with advances in science and technology, there's -- health of the mother has been -- has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one's ever died in childbirth, i know what the science is exactly. what to you make of it with these claims now this shouldn't be an exception for life or health of the mother which we know most people honor those exceptions. >> they're simply not true. i thing he's been going to the todd akin school of biology. 1 in 40 pregnancies, women have pre-eclampsia. there are a number of reasons. but the point is this is not what this district is. this is a moderate district of hardworking people, and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodies. and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you so much for coming on "hardball." good luck next week. >>> when we return, let me finish with a word of warning about mitt romney's transformation in the last couple days, you know, to moderate. >>> let me finish tonight with this. it's
of the social science research institute and a co-organizer of the research is here today. susan, can you please stand to be recognized? thank you. [applause] we also made a pledge to educate the university community about ethics. it's one thing to know the rules, regulations, and policies; it's another thing to create a culture where every employeements to do the right thing the first time every time. through training and awareness building efforts, we're trying to help people understand the how, when, where, and why of reporting. i assure you that penn state takes this commitment very seriously. that's not a glib promise. to prove it, we stepped up efforts in compliance. like most universities, penn state has dozens of compliance professionals. they're responsible for ensuring research funds are appropriately used, they monitor the nca compliance, the financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting, and they administer regulations related to the health, welfare, and safety of those on campuses including our patients. what we've discovered, however, i
science, junk science in universities and these think tanks that is the moral justification for these harsh restrictive conservative policies which take away corporate accountability, which privatize our schools. that's one of their massive endeavors is the privatization of private schools. they've moved now into funding organizations about propaganda to say there's massive voter fraud and justify the activities in polling places on election days. that includes, melissa, a contribution to true the vote which ended up being returned because true the vote didn't have its 501(c)(3) status, but true the vote and organizations that are working with true the vote. hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars to organizations working with true the vote to put a million poll workers in election precincts on election day. >> i want to bring in valerie quickly because she's been making the point about on voting day it should be that every vote counts the same. if it's not advertising, if they're putting voter suppression action in the field, that strikes me as particularly troubling.
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
and from here it's going to go up. the tidal predictions are to the exact science. it's almost like river forecasts. the high drolgss make them with the best knowledge they have. it's not as good as your forecast we give you days in advan advance. it's not the exact science. fluid situation with the storm and a lot of factors and so right now, we're thinking it's going to be about two to three feet higher than what we saw when it was down here on the edge splashing over. that means if i was standing right here at about 8:30 this evening, the water could potentially be somewhere between here to here with wave action over the top of that. this is a flat area in lower manhattan. not a lot of elevation change. about three blocks in inland they have the subways all sandbagged. they are expecting the worst and the possibility of all the water heading underground to the subway system. normally it's heavy rains. they do get flooded. this is saltwater. the electrical switches, all the problems they could have with that. think of the nightmare they would have trying to replace that stuff if it got
in the science. the science of climate change does not consider the sun. the sun is very potent, a very potent aspect of our climate. that is the problem. the sun travels around the black hole in the center of the galaxy and it takes millions of years. each part of this journey has a different results. host: here's more images for you from the newspapers this morning on the aftermath of this storm. here is the new york post, freight in a storm for travelers shows a picture -- franenstorm. and here is the new york post with images of a fleet of the taxicabs sittings of march and a parking lot yesterday in hoboken, new jersey. and the front page of the new trailpost, frankenstorm's of ruin and despair. any despair in queens yesterday. in sacramento, calif., on our line for democrats, go ahead. . caller: i go back to a comment made by one of the candidates. this was an regard to a woman [indiscernible] i was wondering if the same person would think it is an act of god also. thank you. host: that was wesley in sacramento. let me give the political articles before we conclude here. this is the fron
as health of the mother, same thing with the science of technology, health of the mother has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one that has ever died in child birth. i don't know what the science is. what do you make of the claims and most people are. >> that's not true. he's been going to the todd akin school of biology, to be honest. in fact, one in 40 pregnancies are he can topic pregnancy where the fertilize tube and results in the loss of the fetus if you don't -- to save the life of the mother. women who have cancer and need chemotherapy, there's a number of reasons. but the point is, this is not where this district is. it's a moderate district of hardworking people and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodieses and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you. >>> when we return, mitt romney's amazing transformation, you know, to moderate. you're watching "hardball," a place for politics. ♪ this will literally probably never happen
change and casting doubt on the science of climate change cost him dearly today. new york's independent mayor mike bloomberg endorsed president obama referring both to hurricane irene last august and sandy this week. bloomberg wrote and i quote "in just 14 months, two hurricanes have forced us to evacuate nakeds, something our city had -- never done before. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." for more, we have on the phone -- what's going on to get to millions of commuters to work tomorrow, i'm joined by phone by metropolitan transportation spokesman aaron donovan. thanks for joining us. >> thanks, governor, you bet. >> eliot: we know you've begun to get some of the subways above 34th and 42nd street moving again. what will be open tomorrow and then if you could, give us an update on the tunnels which seem to be the major impediment to expanding traffic. >> well, at this point in time, our subway system is essentially cut in half. we have some service
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
. >> this is both from the same gun. >> science is so intricate, scientists can determine if a tool was used to make a bomb or alter a firearm or to construct a homemade silencer. here analyst matched copper wire to the wire of an exploded bomb. these fires belonging to a suspect match markings of a tool used to jimmy a lock. this examiner says tools are like fingerprints. >> each tool has a surface leaving marks on items. >> under his watch criminals can no longer get away with erasing numbers. >> i use methods to restore numbers and able to see what the original number is. >> here at the lab hard to get fingerprints nor problem. this bottle is placed in a chamber with super glue fumes. a dye stain is added to items placed under a laser that i will lup naits objects, revealing prints on the body. analysts can lift fingerprints from just about anywhere. >> we have everything from garbage bags to paper forms. kit be anything they've seen from forensics. >> and and one might say you just can't get away with anything anymore. >> this is time for another check on the forecast now. >> we're going to star
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> jennifer: so for several months now, christine pelosi and i have been trying to get duf sundheim to throw his support behind the president. tonight is our final penitentiary. welcome back to you both. duf are you ready to say uncle? >> you know what, i didn't find the fact that you called the fact that your father your favorite republican, but when you put christie ahead of me it hurt my feelings. >> jennifer: all right. epic fail on my part. >> here you can have the halloween candy. okay. chris christie had a beautiful moment today. not only did barack obama look very presidential but chris christie took a tentative step towards 2016. >> jennifer: yeah, let's just say that duf could have a beautiful moment right here. >> i think that was back in april 15th that you were right. >> jennifer: let me do something here, duf. vice president biden had a very interesting line about mitt romney today. take a listen in florida. >> his plans are sketchy, they are etch-a-sketchy. that's wh
most climate science is junk science, they even would never tie an event ike this to climate change. here's the thing that i pointed out to you, andrew, the last category 3 hurricane was wilma, that was seven years ago. this is the longest period in a century in terms of how long we've been between category 3. back in 1954, between august '54 and august of 1955, the east coast saw three different storms make landfall each of which caused twice as much damage as sandy. now you weren't born in 1954. it caused twice as much. here's the chart of the average global temperature and this quietly was reported by the uk climate office. that shows the average variability from 14 degrees celsius which is the average. there's the no discernible rise in 16 years. >> cuomo's point he was trying to stay out of the controversial subject. he said the political ban derte doesn't want to get to. his question is should new york be prepared for flooding. maybe this is a situation talked about yesterday we're building in areas we shouldn't be building in. >> the storm that caused $180 billion in damage.
question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bothered to vote. with four days to go, president obama and mitt romney made their closing arguments today at multiple stops in ohio and wisconsin. take a look at some of the sights and sounds from this day of campaigning. ♪ >> in this campaign he's tried as hard as he can to repackage, to repackage these same policies and offer them up as change. >> do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> giving more power back to the biggest banks, that's not change. >> and we need real change. >> anoth
apolitical science professor about what could be done. >> reporter: modern democracy uses machines that require electricity to record individual votes and then high- speed computer internet connections to transmit total counts to central election officials. but there may not be electricity even in parts of new york city for next tuesday's scheduled election. rural areas could face even longer delays on power. election officials across the northeast are scrambling discussing whether it is possible to consolidate polling places, use portable generate ours or have some vote by hand the old-fashioned way. what only a few are discussing publicly is any delay in the presidential election, something that has never happened before and here is why. >> i think it would probably take an act of congress to change that and allow states to have the flexibility to do so. the question is would they give individual states the flexibility to change their dates and delay it for a week or even two weeks. >> very unlikely. >> very unlikely, i think that is right. >> wayne stagger says that since most o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 192 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)